Smaller Government Centrist

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Description

You want the government a bit smaller overall than what we have not, but not a whole lot smaller. Usually you could get what you want with a nearly equal mix of Democrats and Republican, if they are the correct Democrats and Republicans. A random selection of each leads to bigger government. Be choosy.

Or you could add a few Libertarians to that equal mix of Democrats and Republicans.

Campaign 2016

The era of Big Government is Back, and it has an attitude!

At least that's the theme of the two major parties. Sad news for smaller government centrists.

But there is some possible good news for you: the Libertarian Party has also nominated a bigger government ticket than is their habit. Instead of nominating a pair of borderline anarchists, the Libertarians have nominated a pair of former blue state Republican governors.

Think Reagan without the drug war or military buildup. Replace senility with a history of off and on marijuana use. (Before you jump to stereotyping, keep in mind that Gary Johnson built a multi-million dollar construction business from scratch, and has climbed the highest mountain on all sever continents. Not exactly a hippy.)

So do check out the campaign web site and watch some of the interviews. Spread the word if you like what you see. Gary Johnson has a small but significant probably of winning. But it is going to require active word of mouth to get from 10% in the polls to the 15% needed to get in the debates.

Fun Reads for Smaller Government Centrists

Imagine less government -- a whole lot less. Such is the subject of my collection of fun libertarian utopias. You may find the magnitude of the cuts impractical, but it's still fun to dream. (And I include some satire and dystopias at the bottom of said page to keep things honest.)

And for some less extreme visions of smaller government, see the social liberal and conservative utopias as well.

Political Parties and Organizations

Modern Whig Party Logo

A common sense pragmatist third political party. What a concept! At least, that is what the Modern Whig Party claims to be. Looking at their web site their views seem to range from centrist to moderate left-libertarian.

A new party. Whether it gets off the ground remains to be seen.

Campaign for Liberty

The Republican Liberty Caucus

Balanced Approaches to Smaller Government

Here are some sites that offer some creative ways to cut excess government while protecting and even extending the values that big government currently serves. media.
Holistic Politics

Freedom, equality, morality, nature,...these are all good things. All to often, political debate rages over which is more important. Synergies get overlooked. There is a better way, holistic politics. By looking at multiple values at the same time, it is possible to come up with creative solutions for the world's problems, solutions that make all the factions more happy.

The Free Liberal

Would you like to fire a hundred thousand bureaucrats? Would you like to restore federalism and bring most domestic government back down to the state level? Then replace the welfare state with free money for all U.S. citizens. Free Money for All
Downsizing Government
A guide to cutting the federal government's budget.

How do we get back to sound money and a stable economy? How do we replace ridiculous financial regulations with accountability? Read Finance and Freedom to find out. You will also find some fun potshots at Keynesian Economics and the Paradox of Thrift. To the Krugmobile! Finance and Freedom

The Progress Report The Progress Report


Economics

Regardless of your political values, economics is worth knowing...
Marginal Revolution

Think economics is just about predicting interest rates? Think again! Marginal Revolution is a very interesting economics blog written by professors at George Mason University.